There is a certain degree of silliness to horticulture. Some of us indulge in it whenever there is an opportunity to do so. I prefer to conform to most rules when I can, but even I rarely engage in irresponsible gardening tactics. My predilection for white, and associated lack of appreciation for more interesting color, might be the most obvious example. Another example is my desire to grow too many useless plants simply because propagation stock happens to be available, or because I happen to enjoy the particular plants. Hey, it keeps me happy.

1. Agave attenuata – fox tail agave needed to be removed from one site, so should have been relocated neatly to another. It instead got cut down (with a chain saw!). It is now a shabby cutting.

2. Calandrinia grandiflora – rock purslane was more fortunate as it remained intact for removal and relocation, but will now get dismantled into a bunch of cuttings. Look at its silly little pot!

3. Phoenix dactylifera – date palm grew from seed in a neighbor’s compost pile. It would be nice if one is female and the other is male, but they could not produce fruit for many years anyway.

4. Lathyrus latifolius – perennial pea is common, but only a few bloom white. I tagged two to dig and can this winter. Well, I did not wait. They were already dormant. Now they are sprouting.

5. Petunia X hybrida – petunia is something that I do not get involved with at work. I lack proficiency with color. My colleague found this ‘Night Sky’ petunia, and despite reviews, is trialing it.

6. Rhody would not allow me to get a good picture of him, so I got this bad one instead. Everyone loves Rhody. He really is exemplary. Even his bad pictures are the best of all Six on Saturday.

This is the link for Six on Saturday, for anyone else who would like to participate:

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/

9 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Folly

    1. Yes, but it would have been easier if it had been dug up with roots still attached. Now that it is cut, it needs to root faster than the stem succumbs to rot. Fortunately, it has a long stem. There is another one her that started with a shorter stem. It is doing well. Before I plugged it, I got a pup from the trunk, which is also doing well. That specimen formerly lived in the median of the Pacific Garden Mall (or Pacific Avenue) in Santa Cruz, but was clobbered by a car and left in the gutter, where I found it.

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  1. I like the Rhody picture and wish I had that Foxtail agave! I like the petunia though I agree with you, having a dreadful summer with Callibrachoa. Oh well, I do the same thing..extra plants that I have to find homes for..

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    1. My colleague here really likes the foxtail agave, so I was pleased to obtain the first specimen last year. They are common in Southern California. I did not notice how uncommon they were here until my colleague here brought it to my attention. The first specimen was found in the gutter of the Pacific Garden Mall in Santa Cruz, where it had been knocked out of the median by a car. That one is doing well, and already gave me a pup. This second specimen will live nearby. If it were not so bulky, I would send the pup by mail. Aren’t they popular there?

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