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Polka dot plant is mostly pink.

Of all the tender perennials, polka dot plant, Hypoestes phyllostachya, is one of the lesser likely to survive winter outside, even if sheltered from the cold. Yet, it is actually becoming more popular as a warm season folliage plant for pots of small mixed perennials. It is a delightful small houseplant, either alone or as an understory plant to larger houseplants like ficus. As an understory plant, It is easier to work with if grown separately in small pots that can get nestled into moss on top of the soil of the larger plants. If it has a problem, it can easily be replaced or removed.

The foliage typically has so many pink spots that less than half of the foliar surface area is green. Some have white or darker reddish pink spots. The bloom is not as interesting as the foliage, and is not often seen. Roots like rich and evenly moist potting soil. The biggest plants are not much more than a foot high. Most stay less than half as tall. New plants are easy to propagate from cuttings. When things get warmer in spring, plants that have more stems than foliage can be cut back to regenerate.

2 thoughts on “Polka Dot Plant

    1. Yes, that can do that in some regions. They were sold as perennials here, but I do not trust that. Technically, they can survive. However, I think that, out in the garden, they would be likely to rot before regenerating after winter here. They might be happier a few miles away, where the weather does not stay so damp through winter and spring, except that they might be more susceptible to frost. I would be inclined to grow it at a ground cover below big houseplants, such as the various species of Ficus.

      Liked by 1 person

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