Some delicate foliage prefers more humidity.

It is difficult to always ignore the weather. Regardless of how pleasant it typically is here, it sometimes gets warm or cool. It occasionally gets hot or cold. Rain is wet and perhaps messy. A breeze is comforting while the weather is warm. Strong wind can be damaging. However, humidity is one major component of local weather that gets little consideration. 

Humidity gets more consideration in climates that are either uncomfortably humid or arid. Some parts of Florida get famously humid and hot simultaneously during summer. Some flora and insects enjoy such weather. Unfortunately for the rest of us, humidity enhances the already unpleasant heat. Locally, hot or warm weather is rarely bothersomely humid.

Similarly, local weather is rarely unpleasantly arid (lacking humidity). This is a chaparral climate, which is ‘semiarid’. Relatively minimal humidity makes heat a bit more tolerable than it would be with more humidity. Yet, humidity is generally sufficient to sustain foliage that would desiccate in a more arid desert situation. Actually, this is an excellent climate.

Although, it is not perfect. Flora and fauna have different standards for exemplary climate and weather. The relatively minimal humidity that makes uncomfortably warm weather a bit more tolerable for people and animals is much less appealing to some plants. Except for those that are native to desert or chaparral climates, most plants prefer more humidity.  

Many popular plants are understory plants, that naturally live in the partial shade of taller vegetation. With shelter from desiccating arid wind and harsh sunlight (to enhance heat), most do not mind heat. Otherwise, foliage might roast. Those with finely textured foliage, such as astilbe, ferns, grasses and some Japanese maples, are particularly susceptible.

Some tropical and subtropical plants, such as split leaf philodendron and fuchsia, prefer to be understory plants here, even if they would prefer more exposure within their natural ecosystems. The shelter provided by more resilient vegetation compensates for deficient humidity. Furthermore, adequate irrigation promotes healthy hydration of delicate foliage. 

4 thoughts on “Humidity Is The Other Weather

  1. This one made me smile, living as I do in an area where “It’s not the heat, it’s the humidity” is both a statement of fact and a common complaint. The most dreaded weather on the Gulf Coast is what we call 90/90 weather: both temperatures and humidity levels in the 90% range.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Gag! I have heard about that sort of thing, but have never experienced it. As much as I want to get out to experience ‘real’ weather, that is one that I could pass on. 90 degrees here is quite warm and perhaps even uncomfortable, but much more tolerable with average or less than average humidity.

      Liked by 1 person

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