These pale, inch-wide, star shaped flowers of pink jasmine may not be much to look at, but are remarkably fragrant.

As winter turns to spring, pink jasmine, Jasminum polyanthum, blooms with abundant, loose trusses of small but very fragrant star shaped flowers. The flower buds that are initially deep pink open to soft pink, and then fade almost to white. Light shade inhibits bloom and limits foliar density, but does not prevent the wiry vines from climbing to twenty feet or so. The dark green leaves are compound with five or seven leaflets. Pink jasmine is one of the few vines that can climb lattice and light trellises without tearing them apart like wisteria and so many other popular vines eventually do. Even if it escapes confinement and gets into trees or onto roofs, it does not get too far to be pruned back within bounds.

4 thoughts on “Pink Jasmine

  1. This is another of our house plants here in the frozen north. It does quite well and is well behaved in containers but rarely blooms again–or does so only with an occasional tiny flower or two. I guess that’s because, like most of the things we grow as house plants, they would be so much happier living outdoors as “real ” plants!
    Karla

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    1. It seems to me that those that bloom most profusely bloom only once annually. Ours blooms throughout most of the year, but only sporadically. The primary bloom phase is typically about half as profuse as it should be. It happens to be blooming nicely this year, so may not bloom sporadically later.

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    1. Yes, it can get wild, and all that fragrance can be a bit excessive. Fortunately, it does not seem to be as aggressive as so many other vines. A nice specimen in Brent’s garden climbs through a big hedge of Ficus microcarpa ‘Nitida’, to spread out over the top to bloom. It gets cut off the top when the hedge gets shorn after bloom, and repeats the process to bloom for the next year.

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