70426The popular wisterias that bloom so profusely before their new foliage appears in spring are Chinese wisteria, Wisteria sinensis. Others specie are rare. The impressively longer floral trusses of Japanese wisteria are not as abundant, and bloom late amongst developing foliage. American and Kentucky wisteria are more docile small vines, but their floral trusses are both short and late.

Chinese wisteria is also the most fragrant and the most colorful of the wisterias. Lavender is still the most popular and traditional color. White, pink, sky blue and darker almost purplish lavender are also available. The floral trusses, known as racemes, get from half a foot to two feet long. Double flowered cultivars never became too popular because the fluffier blooms are not as elegant. The aggressive vines can reach the tops of tall trees. They rarely strangle limbs or young tree trunks, but have the potential to do so. They are more likely to crush fences and lattice. Wisteria really needs sturdy trellises and specialized pruning for confinement. Vines that grow from seed may take many years to bloom. The pinnately compound leaves turn pale yellow before falling in autumn.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “Wisteria

  1. That’s such beautiful stuff. Many years ago my dad planted wisteria at the base of a small pine tree. Both grew well together, and in a few years there was wisteria blooming thru the tree, even at the top. It was a wisteria pine. šŸ™‚ Then with dad gone and my mother getting a little crazy, she had all the trees near the house cut down, cos she was afraid they would all almost instantly fall down on the house. So down went the wisteria pine. šŸ˜¦

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is good that it did not hurt the pine while it was there though. They often overwhelm smaller trees. There is a portion of the redwood forest here that is overwhelmed with wisteria. Although pretty in bloom, it is not so good for the forest.

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s