The camellias are getting meager, but a few are STILL blooming, even a week after the camellias that were blooming so late last week! These pictures were taken at the same time as those for last Saturday. There were just too many to fit into six pictures. Last week, we had two light pink and four white camellias. These are the dark pink or red camellias. There are no pictures of sasanqua camellias, and we have no reticulata camellias.

1. This is probably the biggest of our camellias. I do not know the name of it or any of the camellias here, but I believe that this is one of the old classics that had been around for centuries, and was popular in the 1960s.P80428
2. If this big ruffled dark pink camellia looks like the last one, it just might be. It does not seem to be as deep red, but that might be a result of the exposure.P80428+
3. You know, I do not typically like this simple pink; and I do not typically like this floral form; but for some reason, I really like this simple pink camellia. It just looks so much like a camellia should look.P80428++
4. This floral form is more refined, but looks almost too perfect, as if the flower were assembled by robots on an assembly line.P80428+++
5. This one also seems to have been assembled, but is a bit friendlier. I happen to like such formality.P80428++++
6. Like #3, this one has an unavoidable appeal. It really looks like a camellia should look, although it also looks like it could use some Grecian Formula.P80428+++++
This is the link for Six on Saturday, for anyone else who would like to participate:

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/

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35 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Camellias on Parade II – Another Sequel

      1. There are more at the farm, although there are only about a dozen that ate the most popular. There are several Camellia reticulatas as well, but not many are grown. There is such a limited market for them.

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    1. Thank you. These camellias are in landscaped areas. The camellias at the farm, as well as the rhododendrons and azaleas and everything else, bloom out where there is no one to see them bloom.

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  1. Gorgeous! They graced the landscape in our zone 7-8 of Virginia. Now I’m thinking about trying to grow one of the more hardy camellias in a protected spot in our New England zone 5b-6. Not too hopeful though….

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    1. I have head that they get damaged by frost in colder climates, but I have no experience with it. It just does not get too cold here. They seem like something that would get damaged by frost, but I have never seen it.

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  2. Camellias are so beautiful and here they are like winter roses, although I think camellias are prettier. On the Gulf Coast, ours start blooming at the end of October and different varieties bloom through March. This year was cooler and the bloom time was extended.

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    1. I have found that they are easier to work with in the landscape because they are more spread out. In the nursery, they are a squishy mess! The start to bloom in the rainiest weather, and drop all those flowers that need to be raked to avoid spreading the blight! ICK! In the landscape, no one notices if the flowers just fall to the ground.

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    1. Oh yes. There are many forms. Camellias have been cultivated for a very long time, like chrysanthemums or peonies. Although the color range is not very extensive, they form and size is. There are hundreds of known cultivars.

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    1. They do grow well here, but so many of the mature plants that produced these blooms are overgrown and in need of major pruning. They are not as happy as their flowers would suggest.

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  3. I love the formal ones. But since I begun to keep bees, I have been looking at flowers in a buzzzzing kind of way. I find myself buying more pollen-centred flowers. So glad I can vicariously indulge in my love for formal flowers through blogs!

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  4. My favourite is also number three. But I also like the exuberance of number one. I am trying to work out what I really like in a camellia. As Tim Hewitt said, the frosts here make them look rather sad. I know I don’t like them when they brown at the edges and drop their leaves but surely I can forgive that when they give such glorious early colour? I’m still thinking about them.

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    1. #3 is really the winner here. I do like #1 too, because it is so familiar. It looks like one of my two first camellias.
      I really like growing camellias in the nursery. They are exquisite here in the landscape as well. However, I would not grow too many at home. I do not like cleaning up after them. All the flowers must be raked and dumped or burned because of the blight. Fortunately for us, they look nice all year, with that glossy rich green foliage that works something like holly, but without the fancy texture.

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