81128Here it is, three quarters of the way through November, and this Japanese anemone, Anemone hupehensis or Anemone X hybrida, is finally finishing bloom. It should have finished a month ago, but does not always stay on schedule here. Each cultivar exhibits a distinct responsiveness to the seasons, so others finished a while ago. The deciduous foliage will eventually succumb to frost.

Once they get going in a spot that they like, Japanese anemone slowly spread. Although not considered to be invasive, they can be difficult to get rid of if they creep into spots where they are not wanted. Because they bloom so late in summer and autumn, they get divided in spring. Even old colonies may never need to be divided, but can be divided if more plants are desired elsewhere.

The elegance of the foot high foliage seems contrary to its woodsy and unrefined compatibility with taller shrubbery and small trees, like rhododendrons, Japanese maples and hydrangeas. It is an excellent seasonal understory. The limber stems of the white or pale pink flowers get about twice as high as the foliage. The one and a half to two inch wide flowers are either single or double.

Japanese anemone wants rich soil, partial shade and regular watering. It can be happy in full sun exposure if it does not get too warm and dry.

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6 thoughts on “Japanese Anemone

  1. A gardening friend once told me that Japanese anemones were invasive and I assured her mine were not. Back home, I looked at my small garden with new eyes and had to concede she was right – things have only got ‘worse’ from then on. I still enjoy them, but I keep thinking I ought to try to dig them up.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Mine are just barely surviving. I have seen the get invasive in other gardens, but I have never grown them like that. However, our alstroemerias, which are not normally invasive, have been too prolific here. Callas are another one that can be bothersome if it is too happy.

      Liked by 1 person

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