p90109Now, before I commence with my rant and long list of problems with this picture, I should mention that this seemingly abused rose tree does seem to be appreciated. All the roses in this landscape seem to be very healthy, and they bloom constantly between spring and autumn. Their performance suggests that they are regularly fertilized and deadheaded.
The unusually brutal pruning may be an attempt to keep this particular rose tree as compact as possible, within very limited space. It is not how I would do it, but perhaps it helps. The size of the burl suggest that this rose tree has been pruned effectively like this for a few years, although the lack of weathering of the labels indicate that it is not more than several years old. Older canes really do seem to be getting pruned off annually as they should. Even though the remaining canes are stubbed much too short, the end cuts are done properly. I can not help but wonder of pollarding back to the main knuckle would be just as effective, and neater.
The labels seem to be retained intentionally. In fact, the smaller white label to the left is attached to a new cane. Either the label was removed from an older cane that was pruned away, and attached to a new cane intentionally, or the rose tree was planted only last year rather than a few years ago, as mentioned earlier. I do not know why this uninformative label would have been retained; but the other larger label might be there for anyone who wants to know the name of the rose when they see it blooming in season. It happens to be in a very trafficked spot, where people walk by it constantly.
Rather than snivel about the (seemingly) very bad pruning, and the retention of the (trashy looking) labels, I should just say that this apparently appreciated rose tree should have been planted somewhere else in the garden, or not at all. That wheel in the background really is in a parking spot that is bordered by the red curb. A tiny bit of another red curb on the opposite side of this very narrow space is visible in the very lower right corner of the picture. (I can not explain why the curbs are red.) This really is a very narrow spot between a parking space and a walkway! Those mutilated stems to the right are another shrubbier rose. Thorny rose canes could really be a bother for those getting out of or into a parked car, or walking by on the walkway. The seemingly useless stake might be there so that the rose tree does not get yanked over when it grabs onto someone. To make matters worse, this rose is a grandiflora, which wants to grow bigger and wider than most other types of roses. Defoliation during winter dormancy is no asset either. The pathetic marigold on the ground really does not help much.
The point of all this is that more thought should have gone into planting this rose tree here.
Even Miss Congeniality, who so proficiently adapts to the most unfamiliar of situations, has certain limitations; and this situation demonstrates the worst of them.

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10 thoughts on “Horridculture – Miss Congeniality

    1. It is a significant part of my work, and I tend to notice them when I am not at work. This one does not offend like so many others do. I really get angry when so called ‘professionals’ do such bad things. Such violations are not tolerated in other industries. I can not understand why they are so normal within the horticultural industries, and why clients pay for it.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. In most cases, landscapes would be better with nothing in the place of mutilated plants. Yet, some landscape ‘maintenance’ companies ‘maintain’ them because they get to charge for it.

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Very good point about the adjacent parking… What a very poor choice – especially considering that there are so very many lovely groundcover roses available that would remain unobtrusive. I marvel at those same inane decisions by professionals. Poor Miss Congeniality – she deserved a better fate!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Even the groundcover roses wood be a bother to accidentally step on. Simple lily of the Nile or Indian hawthorn would have worked just fine. There is room for roses elsewhere in more spacious spots in the landscape . . . where the lily of the Nile is.

      Liked by 1 person

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