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Camphor trees have stout branch structure.

The best camphor trees, Cinnamomum camphora, are in parks and other spacious landscapes. Such trees have sufficient room for their broad canopies. Although they do not grow rapidly, they eventually get quite large, and perhaps too massive for confined urban gardens. Some of the older local trees are nearly fifty feet tall, and nearly as broad. They have potential to get much bigger.

Camphor trees excel as shade trees. Their light green or perhaps yellowish evergreen foliage is quite dense. Shade of groups of trees or large trees with low canopies inhibits the growth of lawn grass. Also, roots are likely to eventually elevate lawn or other features that are close to the trunks. Foliar canopies are billowy, but can be lopsided, especially in windy or partly shaded situations.

Trunks and main limbs of camphor trees are rather stout, and can be rather sculptural. Trees should be pruned for clearance while young. Otherwise, obtrusively low limbs can become prominent components of the canopies. The tan bark is distinctively checkered. It darkens handsomely with rain. All parts of camphor tree are quite aromatic. Frass from spring bloom can be slightly messy.

6 thoughts on “Camphor Tree

    1. Bloom deteriorates into a finely textured frass composed of floral parts, such as tiny petals, sepals and pedicels. The parts are too minute to distinguish. They fall from the trees like corn meal. The frass accumulates like polenta in the gutter under the tree in the picture.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ‘Frass’ typically refers to the finely textured debris generated by termites or other insects that bore into wood. I use it for foliar frass because it looks similar.

        Liked by 1 person

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