Bright white variegation brightens shady spots.

Foliar color is not limited to autumn. Some deciduous plants display colorful foliage from spring to autumn. Then, some of these change color for autumn. Some evergreen plants display colorful foliage through the year. Variegation of foliage can be more colorful than associated bloom. So can unvariegated bronze, purple, red, yellow, blue or gray foliage.

All sorts of plants exhibit variegation or other variations of color of their foliage. They can be annuals, perennials, shrubs, vines, trees, or houseplants. Although many are popular primarily because of their foliage, some provide appealing bloom as well. Blue and gray foliage is a natural advantage in harsh climates. Other colors are selections of mutations. 

Because variegation deprives portions of foliar surface area of the chlorophyll needed to perform photosynthesis, it inhibits growth. This can be an advantage for plants that grow too vigorously otherwise. However, many variegated plants occasionally develop growth that is not variegated. If not removed, it can overwhelm and displace desired variegation. 

New Zealand flax, dracaena palm (Cordyline australis), gold dust plant, euonymus, coral bells and hosta are some of the many plants that are more familiar with colored foliage or variegation than without. If simple unvariegated coleus, croton or caladium are available, they must be notably rare. Blue spruce is always blue. Purple leaf plum is always purple. 

Although both gold and gray junipers are popular, the most common are green. Bronzed and variegated cannas are likewise not quite as popular as those with simple lush green foliage. Pittosporum tobira is so much more vigorous without variegation than with it, that the two distinct types of this same species perform different functions within landscapes.

Golden honeylocust supposedly produces lighter shade than darker green honeylocust. ‘Ruby Lace’, a bronze cultivar of honeylocust, supposedly produces faintly darker shade. Some golden or variegated foliage is more susceptible to scorch; although sun exposure enhances foliar color and variegation. Fresh new spring growth gets the best foliar color, but is likely to fade through summer.

2 thoughts on “Variegation And Other Foliar Color

  1. We have some variegated Aegopodium – Bishop’s Weed – left over from the former owners. It is supposed to be less aggressive than the plain-leafed, and also flowers are supposedly sterile. I always cut the flowers when I see them, just in case.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Garden varieties of pampas grass were supposed to be sterile too, but only because they were all female. The problem was that they got pollinated by feral pampas grass (of another species) and their progeny was just as prolific as you can imagine. Even if the Aegopodium is almost completely sterile, if it produces one seedling, the seedling may not be sterile.

      Liked by 1 person

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