It is a long story, but a Eucalyptus tree that I planted with the expectation that it was the same species as this Eucalyptus is completely different, with shaggy and furrowed bark that does not shed. (One is Eucalyptus cinerea and the other is Eucalyptus pulverulenta, but the names seem to be interchangeable.)

Tony Tomeo

P90720KBecause redwoods live for centuries, their bark gets very thick. They do not shed their bark as they grow. Old giant redwoods in the Sierra Nevada have bark that is a few feet thick and thousands of years old. Their bark is thicker than the trunks of what most of us consider to be large trees! Even much younger coastal redwoods that have regenerated here since clear cut harvesting about a century ago have bark that is a few inches thick.
They like their bark thick. It is the insulation that protects them from forest fires that incinerate other vegetation. Unlike most species here that are designed to burn and then regenerate more vigorously after fire, redwoods prefer to survive fire by being less combustible. As they mature, and their bark gets thicker, they become more resilient to fire. There are only a few species here that survive fire mostly…

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