The camellias are STILL blooming! They may not bloom profusely, but they have been blooming for quite a while. I do not know how many different cultivars are here, but there are more than I can fit into just six pictures. There are six more for next week, although two might be the same. They are the dark pink or red camellias. For this week, we have two light pink and four white camellias. I did not get any picture of the sasanqua camellias. I have not seen reticulata camellias or any other specie here.

1. This clear pink camellia is probably my least favorite of these six, only because it is a bit too casual for my taste.P80421
2. This clear pink camellia looks more refined. I really like this form.P80421+
3. Now we have white, my favorite color, but the bright yellow stamens in the middle make this casual camellia look like a fried egg.P80421++
4. I happen to prefer this fluffier white, with less prominent stamens.P80421+++
5. Wow! This one really looks yummy!P80421++++
6. Now my favorite; so simple, and so white, although, the camellia in the previous pictures actually looks yummier!4bd5
This is the link for Six on Saturday, for anyone else who would like to participate:

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/

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37 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Camellias on Parade

  1. This talk of camellias has reminded me – in the mid 90s I lived in Dresden and at Schloss Pillnitz, just outside the city, they have a camellia that was planted in 1801 and is still going strong. They have constructed a greenhouse that runs on tracks to provide shelter in the winter. I visited it back then, and have just checked the website and yes, it’s still doing well.

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      1. They used to have a wooden greenhouse that they took down and rebuilt around it each year, if I remember correctly. The current one on rails was quite new when I was there 20-something years ago. There was a story about the wooden greenhouse catching fire (early 20th century, I think) and everyone thinking that would be the end of the camellia, but it survived.

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    1. You know, it is a hard call. #6 is my favorite, but is a bit too refined. #5 looks more ornate, but also more natural. (Shouldn’t those be contrary qualities?) I think if I were to plant more in a public space like this, I would prefer #5 because of the style. I would put #6 in my own garden.

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  2. Not a fried egg! like a starburst inside a cloud!
    One of the things I like to do with gardening blogs, is ‘window shop’. So if I could have one for my very own, it’d be no.3! If I could have two, it’d be nos. 3 & 5. Such a lovely collection.

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    1. Really? I suppose someone must like that style. Otherwise, they would not be grown. When I grew rhododendrons, there were a few cultivars that I did not like, but there was always a market for them. In the landscape, two specimens of #3 are in a more prominent location, and gets noticed more than most.

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    1. They are an odd one. Almost all do well, but we get a few that get quite sickly. At work, there are several that I want to get rid of, including one seriously distressed sasanqua camellia surrounded by rather healthy sansanqua camellias. I really do not know what the problems are.

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    1. Thank you. It is a pleasure to work with such nice flowers that are not taking up space in my own garden. I never would have planted so many different camellias, but I am glad that someone else did a long time ago.

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  3. I like the fried egg one! I think it’s stamens are so delicate. But the toatally white one is pretty special too. It’s very difficult to grow camellias where I live; I might be lucky with one in a pot in a shady spot, but I’m concentrating on plants that are less fussy.

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    1. You know, I enjoyed growing them in the nursery for other people’s gardens, but would not grow them in my own garden. I might plant one ‘Purity’ if I had a good spot for one, but that would be about it. They are such pretty flowers, but I would rather grow fruits and vegetables, or flowers that, like you say, are not so fussy.

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    1. In early autumn? That is even earlier than mine; MUCH earlier, even though it is happening afterward. I mean, even though it is just starting to bloom, it is doing so in early Australian autumn rather than in winter. Okay, now I am confusing myself. It is no wonder people drive on the wrong side of the road there.

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      1. I think they are a bit early here too. It has been a good growing season and still warm must admit I can’t actually remember when they started last year

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