Gazanias were not planned. The English daisies that were planted last spring as warm season annuals that might hopefully continue as perennials succumbed to rust. Seriously! This rust was nasty! I had no idea that English daisy was so susceptible to rust! They were so ugly that they needed to be removed. They were replaced with the gazanias a bit more than half way through.

Gazanias are not the flashiest of choices for the prominent planters that they went into, but they work. If they continue to bloom through winter, they can stay as long as they like. If they stay long enough to get bald spots, we can trim around the edges and plug the scraps back into the bald spots. I would rather put a bit of effort into maintaining them than replace them as the seasons change.

These pictures were taken about two weeks ago, along with the picture of the gazania that was posted last week. For some unknown reason, the gazanias are presently taking a break from blooming.

1. White is actually not my favorite color for gazanias. Yes, white is my favorite color. I just think that gazanias are at their best in brighter colors like yellow and orange. This white is not the best anyway. It looks like very pale yellow to me.P80922

2. Yellow, in conjunction with orange, is one of the two classic colors for gazanias, and is one of my two favorites . . . in conjunction with orange.P80922+

3. Orange is the other half of the caption to the picture above. (Just read the same caption, and switch ‘yellow’ for ‘orange’, and ‘orange’ for ‘yellow’.)P80922++

4. Pink might really be light burgundy. It was a bit darker when it first bloomed. This might be one of those colors that only girls can identify.P80922+++

5. Yellow with red stripes looks like something that blooms in the garden of Ronald McDonald.P80922++++

6. Cream with burgundy stripes looks like something that blooms in the garden of a clown with slightly more discriminating taste.P80922+++++

This is the link for Six on Saturday, for anyone else who would like to participate:

https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2017/09/18/six-on-saturday-a-participant-guide/

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24 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Gazania

  1. I had to look up English Daisy to find out what it was. Bellis, ubiquitous lawn weed here. OK, I accept there’s been a bit of improvement done for the bedding plant market, but I’m not surprised that something that is so happy here would be well out of its comfort zone where you are. Gazanias can be a bit of a struggle for us, too cold and wet.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. English daisy was not my idea. It is also a very common lawn weed here. Those that we planted are garden varieties with white, pink and red flowers.
      The Gazanias were not my idea either, but they are working out nicely.

      Like

    1. That is fine. It would not be much fun if we all agreed. I think that #3 is my favorite too, just because it is such a perfect orange. I prefer it to #1 because #1 is sort of grungy white rather than bright white. I know that #5 is probably my least favorite. I dislike clowns.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I adore gazania in all their colours. They add such a great cheer to the low part of any flower bed. I’m w/N20 in liking 1 & 3 best, but it’s a hard choice, as they’re all so pretty.

    Liked by 1 person

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