90130Some of us who enjoy gardening may not like to admit how useful the internet can be. There is a lot of bad information out there. There is also some degree of good information. It is impossible to fit much information about apples into just a few brief paragraphs. Therefore, the internet is likely the best source of information about the countless cultivars and specie within the genus of Malus.

The most popular apple trees produce the familiar crisp and sweet fruit that ripens anytime between late summer and late autumn, depending on cultivar. The fruit is quite variable. Some cultivars are best for eating fresh. Others are best for cooking or juicing. Some are very sweet, while other are quite tart. Each fruit is about the size of a baseball, but can be much bigger or much smaller. Crabapples are very small. Flowering crabapples make only tiny fruits that are eaten by birds.

The trees are quite variable too. Semi-dwarf trees can be pruned to stay low enough so that all of the fruit is within reach from the ground. Standard trees that grow in orchards can get as big as shade trees. All fruiting apple trees need specialized pruning each winter so that they do not become overgrown and disfigured, and to control disease. All apples bloom sometime in early spring.

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2 thoughts on “Apple

    1. It is a pippin type, but no one seems to know which one. It could be a Rhode Island Greening, but I do not know of anyone who grows that specific cultivar here. The color is right, but it lacks the slight russetting on top and slight blushing on exposed sides. That could be a result of the weather though. Some pippin types in Watsonville were grown for the cider and such. The pippins on the farm were probably planted only because they last so long into the winter, after the other apples are gone. They are not as good here as they are in other regions. They are quite hard, and although they last a long time, they can eventually get starchy.

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