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These primrose look as good as they did last year.

Among cattle, a cow is a female who has calved. Prior to that, she was a heifer. A bull is an adult male. A bullock is a juvenile male or castrated bull. Most cattle are males who were castrated while young, and are known as steers. Yet, cattle are commonly known collectively as ‘cows’.

Similarly, bedding plants are commonly known collectively as ‘annuals’. Many really are annuals. However, some are biennials; an even more are, to some degree, perennials.

Replacing annuals annually make sense. They grow, bloom and die within one year. Some sow seed to regenerate if and when they get the chance. In the prominent spots of our gardens, not many are likely to get such a chance before they are replaced by other annuals for more immediate gratification within the next season.

The same applies to bedding plants that have potential to perform as perennials. They too get replaced during their off season. Since most are inexpensive, their untimely collective demise is not considered to be too terribly wasteful.

There are a few that are not so easy to part with. Cyclamen will be a topic for next week because it is a cool season perennial that is too expensive to be deprived of its potential to regenerate and bloom next autumn and winter.

These English primrose from last winter were afforded an opportunity to stay in their landscape while they were somewhat dormant through the warmth of last summer, so that they could regenerate last autumn and bloom through this winter. A few from around the edges were moved inward to replace a few that did not survive. Impatiens were planted in front for summer.

The results are not exemplary only because of the shade, but are worth the effort of not putting effort into replacement.

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Two seasons for the price of one.

4 thoughts on “Not So Annual

  1. Our primroses–the kind the shops sell in early spring, even the hardware store–keep blooming for years but even when divided are not as robust and large flowered as the first year. I actually like them better as they rebloom the next year with smaller, more delicate flowers.

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    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, they do not look so synthetic the second time around. They are probably much happier in your climate. They are mostly dormant through summer here, so are considered to be cool season annuals.

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    1. When I worked for a so-called ‘landscape’ company, disposable annuals were too profitable to be replace with sustainable perennials. While bragging to clients about our ‘sustainable’ practices, we also sold them on copious amounts of annuals. Ick!

      Liked by 1 person

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