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African daisy excels as bulb cover.

They are more than just shrubbier and more colorful versions of the formerly stigmatized trailing African daisy. Modern African daisies are actually various hybrids of several other species. Extensive breeding complicated their lineages enough for them to be known by cultivar names rather than by species names. To one degree or another, most are probably related to Osteospermum ecklonis.

These fancier modern hybrids of African daisy grow as annuals in harsher climates. If planted just after the last frost date, they bloom splendidly for early spring, and continue to bloom sporadically through summer. If they grow and bloom a bit too well, they may like to be trimmed back to bloom some more. Locally, they persist through winter as short term perennials, to bloom as winter ends.

Bloom provides pastel hues of yellow, orange, pink, ruddy pink, lavender, purple or white. Early spring bloom is most profuse, particularly for fluffy plants that were not trimmed back over winter. The biggest sprawling plants should get trimmed back after bloom. Subsequent sporadic bloom, mixed with random profuse phases, is inhibited only by warm summer weather and cool winter weather.

African daisy wants full sun and regular watering. Mature plants get about two feet deep and broad. If pressed into the soil, outer stems can develop roots to grow as new plants, as the original dies.

6 thoughts on “African Daisy

  1. I just love these plants. They are only annuals for me and in hot summers that means that I get about 3 months of blooming if I am lucky. But what I especially love are their centers (you’ll have the correct botanical name). I am more interested in all the beautiful color mutations that they go through. You have captured it in your photo. That, to me, is what makes these plants really shine!

    Karla

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. When I first saw this sort, it was sold as an annual. I would not have purchased them as such. However, some of those that were planted as annuals in other gardens are around for a few years. They are considered to be perennials now.

      Like

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