Is a cat burglar a kitty who steals things, or someone who steals from kitties? There are a few kitties here, and, apparently, a burglar. I determined that two of the kitties are appropriate for Six on Saturday because they have horticultural names. The burglar is less appropriate, and is gone anyway. I am quite annoyed that someone came here, likely during the day, and stole from us. A small hesper palm that I grew from a seedling, two specimens of golden bamboo, and a larger Mexican fan palm got taken.

1. Cat – Black Jack, like the oak, Quercus marilandica, has a good horticultural or arboricultural name. He is a solid black Maine coon cat, and is no more cooperative for a picture than Rhody.

2. Burglar – Hesper palm, Brahea armata, lived here, in the blank spot on top of the wall. Golden bamboo, Phyllostachys aurea, lived right behind it and in the blank spot four cans to the right.

3. Cat – Pepper, like a species of Caspicum, has a good horticultural name too. She looks something like a penguin with a bit of brown, but is no more cooperative for a picture than Black Jack.

4. Burglar – I know I brought back more shoots of this unidentified species of Aloe from my downtown planter box. At least these four remain. They will get groomed and return to the planter.

5. Canna – This also came from the downtown planter box. It needed to be removed to facilitate the repair of a few broken tiles. It will eventually return with the Aloe. This bloom is a surprise.

6. Vine maple – Acer circinatum is still healthy and reasonably happy after getting yanked from its landscape by a backhoe during the warmth of summer. I did not expect it to survive so well.

This is the link for Six on Saturday, for anyone else who would like to participate:

15 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Cat Burglar

    1. The loss of the hesper bothers me most. It was one of only two in the region. Since it was taken without anyone asking me about it, I doubt that whomever took it knows what it is, or what its cultural requirements are. It will likely get planted into a situation that is not suitable for it, or if it survives, it will grow up and become a major problem. The loss of the Mexican fan palm bothers me because it had plans. It was to be returned to the neighbor who planted it. I dug and canned it when he relocated. I will not miss the bamboo, but I do not want them planted where they will become a problem either. I suspect that whomever took these items was someone who works here, but is unaware that these items are not within the stock that we use in the landscape. They were within my own stock, which I mostly have plans for. There are some very important plants out there!

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    1. I suspect that whomever took them thought that they were part of the stock that we use in the landscapes here, rather than my own stock. It annoys me more that they took items that they likely do not know how to take care of. The bamboo could very easily become a very serious problem if it gets planted into the wrong situation. The hesper palm has very specific cultural requirements. I sort of expect to see these items dried up and shriveled out on a deck in the neighborhood.

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  1. Every so often at work we have the same issue: people steal our container plants. I really wonder about people who steal plants because for the most part gardeners are so giving. We share cuttings and divisions and whole plants so readily. You think–do people not know this? It must be something else–particularly in your case!

    Karla

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    1. I suspect that these items were taken by someone who thought they were part of the stock that we use in the landscapes at work, rather than my own stock. It annoys me more that I doubt that whomever took them knows what they are, and that bamboo can be a serious problem, or that hesper palm is so finicky.

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  2. I hope the thief knows how to care for them. Or, the people they’re sold to do. Such a shame. My mother had a big Boston fern stolen off her front porch once. The porch wasn’t even near the street, and the street not a busy one, so it had to have been someone in the neighborhood.

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    1. That is what annoys me most. I do not believe that they were intentionally stolen. I believe that they were taken by someone who thought that they were part of the stock that we use in the landscapes here, rather than my own stock. Nonetheless, I am concerned that the bamboo will get planted where it can become a major problem, and that the hesper palm will not survive. I suspect that they are dried and crispy by now, still in their cans, on a neighbor’s porch.

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  3. Someone stole two Japanese maples from my yard. They had just started to really fill in. When I reported it to the police they told me the apple growers in the next county have problems with people stealing trees. I truly feel your pain.

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    1. These were not quite as important as maturing Japanese maples (although I dislike Japanese maples). Japanese maples are more of a major investment. The bamboo was only here because it needed to be removed from somewhere else. I am sad about the hesper palm though, since I grew it, and will not likely ever grow it again.

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  4. What a disappointment a burglary is. You may need to do your best to replace those items (though it sounds challenging) and not let the resentment build. Been there, done that. Other than that, love the vine maple. I’m eager for our to begin showing off their beauty this fall…

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    1. Oh, they will not be replaced. The bamboo was here only because I could not bear to discard all of what was removed from one of the landscapes. I would be pleased to know that it went to a ‘good’ home. The Mexican fan palm was canned for a neighbor who relocated. It could not stay where it was, so he was to take it with him. The hesper palm was the most important of the bunch, but even it was only here because it lacked a home. Once it matured somewhat, it would have needed to go somewhere else anyway.

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