Naked lady, Amaryllis belladonna, is common beyond the landscapes here. Most live on roadsides, likely because that is where we relocate superfluous bulbs, and toss seed after deadheading. All the flowers of a big colony outside the gates at our industrial yard got harvested as they came into bloom this year! Another colony at the historic depot blooms most spectacularly, and was just deadheaded after I got these pictures. Since they were finished with bloom, and still lack foliage, there was not much to get six pictures of. That is why I got two pictures of their neighbors with a third picture of where former neighbors had been.

1. Sarcococca ruscifolia, which does not do well elsewhere, became an exemplary foundation hedge here on the historic depot. Why is it all gone now? A sewer to a septic system was replaced.

2. Echinacea purpurea continues to bloom on the front of the same historic depot. It is prettier than that recently exposed mud between the foundation and the driveway on the opposite side.

3. Amaryllis belladonna continues to bloom, sort of. The majority finished bloom a while ago. Their many bare stems are visible in the background. A few small colonies bloom distinctly later.

4. Amaryllis belladonna otherwise looks like this now. The stems that finished blooming are slightly taller than those that continue to bloom slightly later. Seed will get tossed on the roadside.

5. Amaryllis belladonna that bloom later have pale brownish stems. The five pale brownish stems in the foreground here continue to bloom. The greener stems in the background are finished.

6. Hydrangea macrophylla is unusually happy in front of the historic depot. This floral truss is about a foot wide. There would be more like this, but deer ate them and the roses before bloom.

This is the link for Six on Saturday, for anyone else who would like to participate:

2 thoughts on “Six on Saturday: Naked Ladies And Neighbors

  1. I’ve never seen the seed pods of naked ladies. It makes perfect sense that they should look like the seed pods of our native rain lilies. I’ve always been tickled with how perfectly those seeds are stacked inside their little chambers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The bulky seed are rather perishable. They should be sown rather quickly, and watered in. If not deadheaded they stay fresh for a while on the stalks, and then fall over onto the ground with the first rains. Since I deadhead them, I put the stalks aside to dry before taking the seed, which gets tossed out prior to the first rains. They are remarkably resilient to the chaparral climate, but their seed are remarkably sensitive to desiccation.

      Liked by 1 person

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