P91215-1English holly is politely naturalized here. This means that, although naturalized, it is not aggressively invasive, and does not seem to be too detrimental to the ecosystem. It is only annoying to see out in forests, far from the landscapes that the seed escaped from, and wonder if it has potential to significantly compete with native vegetation. It would be better if it were not there.

At least it is pretty. In refined landscapes, it happens to be one of my favorites for distinctively glossy and prickly foliage. There is nothing else like it. Variegated cultivars are just as striking, with a bit of color for situations where there is already plenty of rich dark green. Female plants produce a few bright red berries. Older or distressed plants might produce more than others.

So, I have mixed feelings about this overgrown English holly tree that I must eventually cut down. In the picture above, it is evident that it is not the prettiest. It is a sparsely foliated thicket of tangled inner stems on an uninterestingly straight and bare trunk. It occupies a prominent position where there should be something of a friendlier disposition. It doesn’t contribute much.

However, it does produce an abundance of delightfully bright red berries. I got these pictures while collecting berries to decorate the buffets and tables of the big dining room across the road.

If it were in my garden, I would probably pollard it back to the bare trunk or perhaps just a short stump, and allow it to regenerate with fresh new foliage. Such a procedure would eliminate the tangled thicket of bare interior stems, but would unfortunately inhibit berry production for at least a few years while new growth matures. I just do not want to give up on it completely.P91215-2P91215-3

6 thoughts on “Deck the Halls

  1. I always liked Hollies until I moved to Oregon. Actually, I still like them, but they are really invasive here. You’ll find little sharp, prickly seedlings everywhere, around where there is a mature tree. In Sweden, they grow very slowly, and rarely become very big. But yes, those berries are hard to beat around the holidays.

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    1. They do not seem to mind the mild alkalinity here, although they are notably absent from more alkaline regions. (There are quite a few of those in California.) Not many Californians appreciate colored berries through winter. Not many of us are familiar with them. Besides, there is so much other color through winter here.

      Liked by 1 person

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