While so many of us in the Northern Hemisphere were contending with unusually warm weather, our weather here had been unusually mild. The weather only recently became warm for the past two weeks or so. It did not get unusually hot here like it did in so many other regions, but the warmth developed suddenly enough to damage many of the flowers that were blooming at the time. This included many of the new perennials that we happened to be installing at the time. Consequently, there were not nearly as many flowers to get pictures of as there had been in May, and some of the flowers in these pictures show damage from the sudden change in the weather. I am sorry that I neglected to participate in Bloom Day in June.

These pictures were taken at work, on the Santa Cruz County side of the Santa Cruz Mountains above Los Gatos, closer to Felton. The climate is more coastal than the chaparral climate of the Santa Clara Valley, although both are within USDA Zone 9.

Carpet Roses are the lowliest of all roses, but they happen to be more functional for more landscape applications than other roses are. These got pruned back to a few canes over winter, and will get trimmed for confinement about now, but really do not need any more work than that. They bloom profusely in a few phases. They are only looking tired now because of the weather.7bd1Hydrangea are finishing in most other areas here. These are odd ones. They are more exposed to harsh weather conditions than others, but are somehow lasting later than those that are more sheltered. They are blue instead of pink, but are not in what would be considered acidic conditions within redwood forests. Nor were they fertilized to be blue. No one is complaining.7bd2Yarrow was planted just before the weather changed. Once established, it does remarkably well in the endemic soil and climate.7bd3Yarrow unfortunately got roasted by the sudden warmth. These yellow (or ‘golden’) flowers are getting quite crispy already.7bd4Coneflower was likewise planted just before the weather changed, and likewise got roasted. These happen to be some of the best at the moment.7bd5Valley Oak probably qualifies as appropriate for Bloom Day because it really is blooming right now. You just can not see it. The dust is everywhere. I really like this grand and sculptural tree. The valley oak happens to be the biggest oak in North America, and it also happens to live here, on the outskirts of groves of coastal redwoods, which are the tallest trees in the World.7bd6Valley Oak is so excellent that I had to get another picture of it from another angle. The first picture was looking about south toward the midday sun. This is looking almost to the east, perpendicularly to the other picture. The cars in the foreground are much closer than they seem to be. The trunk of the tree is significantly wider than it seems to be in relation to the cars.7bd7Garden Bloggers all over America and in other countries can share what is blooming in their gardens on the fifteenth of each month on “Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day”, hosted by Carol Micheal’s May Dreams Garden at http://www.maydreamsgardens.com

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6 thoughts on “Garden Bloggers’ Bloom Day July 15 – Summer Weather Has Arrived

  1. I didn’t know about bloom day! Looks like things are doing well, and are from the relatively early end of late spring early summer. We are in the midst of heat and nor rain, which makes for glorious weather and a lot of watering.

    Liked by 1 person

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